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  • Kristen (Portfolio)
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  • Kristen (Portfolio)
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  • Kristen (Portfolio)
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  • Kristen (Portfolio)
  • Kristen (Portfolio)
  • Kristen (Portfolio)
  • Kristen (Portfolio)
  • Kristen (Portfolio)
  • Kristen (Portfolio)
  • Kristen (Portfolio)
  • Kristen (Portfolio)
  • Kristen (Portfolio)
  • Kristen (Portfolio)
  • Kristen (Portfolio)
  • Kristen (Portfolio)
  • Kristen (Portfolio)
  • Kristen (Portfolio)
  • Kristen (Portfolio)
  • Kristen (Portfolio)
  • Kristen (Portfolio)
  • Kristen (Portfolio)
  • Kristen (Portfolio)
  • Kristen (Portfolio)

Chantal Joffe and Miles Aldridge

Kristen (Portfolio)

“Kristen, As Seen By Miles Aldridge And Chantal Joffe”

61 x 47,5 x 5 (Box size)
This edition contains 11 art works. All artworks are housed in a handmade linen slipcase:
– 5 Giclée colour prints on Hahnemühle paper signed and numbered by Chantal Joffe
– 6 Lambda c-prints signed and numbered by Miles Aldridge

This portfolio has been produced in conjunction with the exhibition “Kristen – as seen by Miles Aldridge and Chantal Joffe” in 2010.

Edition 60

In this rare artistic collaboration, the photographer Miles Aldridge invited contemporary painter Chantal Joffe to explore the theme of ‘the artist and model’. The resulting works in black and white and colour photographs, ink and pencil drawings as well as watercolour and oil paintings create a fascinatingly obsessive and emotional study of one woman: the super-model Kristen McMenamy.

Aldridge is well known for high-gloss, high-drama images of women captured in pop colours.

“In his acid-coloured images of lascivious lips, impossibly glossed models and hallucinogenic still lifes, photographer Miles Aldridge is plainly heir to some of the twentieth century’s enduring pop culture visionaries.” Art Review, April 2009

For this latest project Aldridge set out to create a study of one woman scrutinized by various media – the mechanical precision of the camera versus the painter’s expressive brushstrokes. “I wanted a friction between the textures of painting, pencil and photography. I was excited by how that could look on a gallery wall,” says Aldridge.

He immediately thought of London-based artist Chantal Joffe. “She uses paint properly and gives you that gory, painterly texture that I love – drippy, splattered and quite violent.” In contrast to Aldridge’s vision of women, Joffe’s portraits offer an emotional, deeply human response to her subjects. In the introduction to the catalogue of her 2008 exhibition at the Victoria Miro Gallery in London, Neal Brown wrote:

 Joffe has a ‘disorder’ in the sense that, working within the often anti-intuitive context of contemporary art, she not only seeks the truth of human emotions, but does so with unfashionable compassion and humanity. Diligently, thoughtfully, she attends to the one thing that is of most visual interest to human beings and their visual artists: the face – or, perhaps we should say, to the emotions and feelings as the face reveals and expresses them.

Aldridge and Joffe worked in tandem in Joffe’s East London studio, taking turns to lead and follow. While Joffe favoured softer, more traditional life-model positions, Aldridge encouraged Kristen to adopt a more erotic stance, characteristic of the photographic style for which he is famous.

Joffe’s expressive works in oils and watercolours, which frequently drip, smudge and blur, capture Kristen at ease, in the contemplative mode of a life-model relaxing into a long pose; the accompanying black and white images taken by Aldridge during those sessions pay homage to that naturalism.

Aldridge’s colour images of Kristen are highly charged – the artist’s model turned femme fatale. Acid yellow and lurid violet replace the softer sorbet tones of Joffe’s palette. The spiky immediate graphic works drawn by Joffe record that intensity of mood.

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